Tagsocial media

#delete campaigns: social solidarity vs privacy

Uber: Travel ban

January 2017, we witnessed #deleteuber social media campaign. The movement erupted after Trump’s ban on travel ban from Muslim-majority countries, when NYC taxi drivers went on strike. At the very same moment Uber announced “surged pricing on JFK airport” being turned off.

February 2017 benchmarks shown 200,000 accounts being deleted as an act of solidarity against US President decision.

Cambridge Analytica: Elections

March 2018, Christopher Wylie, whistleblower from Cambridge Analytica (has nothing to do with famous university), gives an interview to Guardian on how the company was collecting Facebook user profiles and presumably helped targeting elections campaign for Republican Party to win the elections.

The whole social media just went nuts on the subject. A chance of your social profile being harvested for micro-targeting to form your opinion on any sociopolitical matter, launched yet another delete campaign – #deletefacebook. Today, it’s been reported on 87m profiles may’ve been leaked to Cambridge Analytica, which is said to be a part of SCL Group.

Some details on who these folks are:

SCL’s involvement in the political world has been primarily in the developing world where it has been used by the military and politicians to study and manipulate public opinion and political will. It uses what have been called “psy ops” to provide insight into the thinking of the target audience. According to its website, SCL has influenced elections in Italy, Latvia, Ukraine, Albania, Romania, South Africa, Nigeria, Kenya, Mauritius, India, Indonesia, The Philippines…(c) Wikipedia

What’s quiet interesting about this whole story, that it’s emphasised the privacy leak at first place. Next week it twisted into yet-another-Trump fault, and all the hell broke loose in social networks.

Frankly speaking, this Trump for/against campaign is not my thing, I’m not  a US citizen. I didn’t vote. Thus, I don’t care. American elections is solely the matter of US people.

Technically speaking, as a person who reads and does some IT things, it breaks down to the subject of privacy, and the medium that we use in day-to-day routines.

If you’re not paying for the product, you are the product

Whenever you use any social medium, you share your private information. Those crazy useless quizzes, asking for your locations, ads rotation, bounce rates. It was just the matter of time, when some company will appear on the horizon and start crunching your data for its own purposes. Marketing tools in combination with psychology and IT, might give you a proper railgun in social science and opinion forming.

It’s your decision to support or ignore #deletefacebook movement. Edward Snowden gave an interview on the matter, that has some insights on your data privacy and the state control. He might be right, that it’s us – our generation – that will impose the control of our personal data, or it’s too late.

Twitter as communication tool for botnets

ESET researchers discovered an Android backdoor Trojan controlled by tweets. Detected by ESET as Android/Twitoor, it’s the first malicious app using Twitter instead of a traditional command-and-control (C&C) server.

After launch, the Trojan hides its presence on the system and checks the defined Twitter account in regular intervals for commands. Based on received commands, it can either download malicious apps or change
the C&C Twitter account to another one.

“Using Twitter to control a botnet is an innovative step for an Android platform,” says Lukáš Štefanko, the ESET malware researcher who discovered the malicious app.

First appearance of twitter-controlled botnets though was discovered in 2009, as mentioned in the article.

Comparing Twitter to other social media like Facebook, blogs (WordPress, Tumblr), Twitter stands out as a massive communication protocol – everyone talks with everyone, the message format is defined, limited by size. Twitter’s been used as a communication tool in many occurrences, either helping people as “Twitter monitoring of decease outbreaks“, or organising massive manifestations in Taksim square, Turkey.

twitter_cover

No wonder, why we ended up seeing Twitter as botnet communication tool.

In those days, I posed the concept that Twitter should not be a company alone. It should be an open protocol much like HTTP or email protocols (IMAP/POP). There should be an adopted industry standard that Twitter, the company, should and could (and still can) champion and work through with the guidance of other industry members.

It’s been published in 2012. Four years later, we’re witnessing the results, and more interesting things to come. There have been rumours that Twitter isn’t profitable, but tools it developed will evolve in the community anyway. Ideas get their niche and evolve in new products.

Bored with your free time?

This tweet had to land here without any doubts, as those who maintained open-source projects know the drill. 

In case this tweet disappears, or something happens in far far future:

Social media: Detoxification

It’s one of those posts at the end of the year, summing up the results of 2014 and preparing for 2015.

As the main challenge of 2015, I’ll be slowly leaving social media towards old school writing and mumbling about different daily stuff in my blog.

  • September 2014 – vk.com account closed.
  • December 2014 – Instagram account closed.
  • Facebook account – remains for cross-posting
  • Google+ – do I still have it?
  • Twitter – never been writing there much, mostly used by Social plugin in my blog.

Too much time wasted for repetitive information flow in social media.

Enormously small percentage of that data is useful. Plus, most of the people in friends list are known personally – so why spoiling the opportunity of sharing something good personally. Socialise offline! 😉

Automattic valued 1B

Great products, small productive teams. A place to work!

Automattic, the company behind WordPress.com and other Web publishing tools, has raised $160 million from investors.

Including Insight Venture Partners, CEO Matt Mullenweg confirmed.


The round values the nine-year-old company at $1.16 billion. After the investment, which is its first since it raised $12 million in 2008.

Recode

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