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Qobo: first month benchmark

It’s been already one month since I moved to Qobo Ltd, as a backend developer, so it’s about time to do some benchmarks on the work done.

Open-Source

The level of open source involvement of Qobo is enormous. All the projects I’ve been involved in before were always about open-source: it was either based on open-source, or using open-source solutions into some extend. Every time it ends up locking down the solutions for indoor use. It was either features the company didn’t want to share with the open-source community, or key business aspects that were crucial for competitive advantage. The story repeats over and over – the level of feedback to open source was minimal.

Contrarily, Qobo’s approach towards open-source is different. I didn’t do the exact measures, but it’s approximately 70-80% of code that goes to public repositories. Apart of advocating open-source within the company, we participate in other development communities, which helps us get things better. What’s the point of getting stuck with yet another closed-source plugin/module/library that others troubleshooted/patched and use everywhere. Examples? Well, it’s CakeDC community, CakePHP framework, WordPress, Bootstrap, and many others.

Side-effects of it:

  • You write better code (if you want to get things accepted in pull requests)
  • You stand on the shoulders of giants (community helps. Always)
  • Self-development (you’re not stuck with repetitive tasks)
Teams

Q: how many programmers does it take to change a light bulb?

A: none, that’s a hardware problem (c)

Small teams, dedicated to certain projects or split by the expertise in certain technology or business aspects. Mind blowing speed of deployment & accuracy. The most appropriate way of describing the social system and involvement in the projects would be meritocracy – “We do it, because we can”.

 

Yarn: package manager for JS modules

Yarn kitty rocks!
Yarn kitty rocks! Yarn kitty rocks!

Yarn is a package manager for your code. It allows you to use and share code with other developers from around the world. Yarn does this quickly, securely, and reliably so you don’t ever have to worry.

Yarn allows you to use other developers’ solutions to different problems, making it easier for you to develop your software. If you have problems, you can report issues or contribute back, and when the problem is fixed, you can use Yarn to keep it all up to date.

Absolutely great article by Seth Godin on hardware/software perspectives.

Looking at the giants, like Apple. Here are some of points from the article:

  • Software can change faster than hardware, which means that in changing markets, bet on software.
  • It’s tempting to treat the user interface as a piece of fashion, some bling, a sort of jewelry. It’s not. It’s the way your user controls the tool you build. Change it when it stops working, not when you’re bored with it. Every time you change the interface, you better have a really good reason.
  • Hardware always gets cheaper. If you can’t win that race, don’t run it.
  • Getting users is far more expensive than keeping users, which means that investing in keeping users is the smartest way to maintain your position and then grow.
  • Software can create connection, and connection is the engine of our future economy.

Base32 advantages over Base64

I stumbled upon these little facts, why engineers chose Base32 over Base64 for shared secret key:

  1. The resulting character set is all one case, beneficial when using a case-insensitive filesystem, spoken language, or human memory.
  2. The Base32 result can be used as a file name because it can not possibly contain the '/' symbol, which is the Unix path separator.
  3. To avoid similar-looking pairs of different symbols they picked an alphabet , so the strings can be accurately transcribed by hand.
  4. Base32 result excluding padding can be included in a URL without encoding any characters.

I’m sure everyone mixed 'I','B','0' and '1','8','0' in hist life.  RFC 4648 omits these symbols.

World’s Best Hikes: 20 Hikers’ Dream Trails – National Geographic

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National Geography publishes world’s best 20 hikes: France, Italy, Switzerland. Definitely the places to visit for hiking.