CategoryBlogging

All the things that bother me, or bother me not that much, or not bother me at all

Classic programmer paintings

“Github Major Service Outage”. Georges Seurat, 1884

Brilliant collection of classical oil paintings with modern interpretation. 

“InfoSec team verifies security flaw.”
Caravaggio, 1601-1602

Google open sources its English parser

Today, we are excited to share the fruits of our research with the broader community by releasing SyntaxNet. 

An open-source neural network framework implemented in TensorFlow that provides a foundation for Natural Language Understanding (NLU) systems.

Our release includes all the code needed to train new SyntaxNet models on your own data, as well as Parsey McParseface.

Parsey McParseface – English parser that we have trained for you and that you can use to analyze English text.

Announcing syntaxnet

Google announced the release of their English parser earlier today. Great news, let’s see how it will influence the market in the nearest future.

JavaScript: shooting yourself in the foot with configs once again

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Don’t be mainstream!

I’m not the only one blown away after digging up some of React/Redux boilerplate code. Great article proving some of my thoughts on the subject:

Copy-pasting configs from boilerplate projects always leads to hard-to-debug issues like this. It’s easy to miss somebody’s configuration decisions when you’re not the one making them. Don’t use boilerplate projects unless you understand each and every technology it uses!

I understand Dan’s frustration. But could we look at this from a different perspective? Don Norman’s The Design of Everyday Things teaches that there’s no such thing as “user error” — humans always make mistakes, and the failure to deal with these is on the product, not the user. How would we approach these user errors if we looked at them as design failures?

Yet another justification of “convention over configuration” and the reason of choosing EmberJS at the given time. Sorry React, not now, maybe a bit later.

Electron: built desktop apps in JavaScript

Electron allows you to build desktop applications with web technologies like HTML, JavaScript and CSS.

Among the early adopters of Electron, you can see these names:

Development: code of conduct

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Always code as if the person who ends up maintaining your code is a violent psychopath who knows where you live.

Code of conduct – absolutely great thing in the world of open source and overwhelming media. We try to setup a certain pattern of communication with others, to avoid bashing, insults or any other types of miscommunication.

It perfectly works in community organisation. People know their “do’s” and “don’ts”. Every now and then, I wonder why it’s not always applicable to distributed teams, working on common tasks. I’m talking not about the communicational aspect of conduct, – but an actual work.

Apparently, it comes down to styling guides, and “convention over configuration” concept of team work, when you deal with application development with semi-isolated groups, but nevertheless, let’s get ourselves to the lists. We all do like lists:

  • Web Design & Layout structuring
  • Front-end Development
  • Back-end Development

All three disciplines use their own sorcery to get things going, but in between, there’s always a time lose.

Web Design & Layout structuring

Usually, people in charge for it are “super busy” to deal with minor requirements, and you might end up with messy stylesheets, and unstructured HTML layouts in common pages. If you get your head up for a little while, and stop re-inventing wheels, and realise that most of your time you write repetitive components on HTML/CSS, no matter how they look – it’s a win!

Apparently, you thought about using CSS frameworks, like Twitter Bootstrap, or Grid 960 to name a few. If you still in complete denial of the fact, that it’s useful, and keep writing your on CSS every time you get a new client – I’m glad for you, but please, use the standards. It’ll definetely reduce the number of “psychopaths” mentioned above.

Hey, but it’s not the end. ECSS perfectly matches LESS/SCSS. I can ensure you, developers will say “thank you” for that, especially when they have to deal with large scaled application, and side-projects that deal with common stylesheets and building them every now an then.

I really hope, I got you convinced of stop using “input1/input2/btn3” identifiers in your CSS, and spend some time reading the stuff.

Front-end Development
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I’m here not to discuss the callback hell of jQuery, and the mess you might made with all the plugins you googled, but hey, the world has changed drastically. If the stylesheets and HTML layout was done correctly, I’m pretty sure there must be one tiny happy front-end developer that doesn’t have to stay awake all night figuring out how to deal with all that sh###, or maybe simply change his job and move to Ibiza.

The world’s become a better place with JS6 standards, Ember, Angular and React at your fingerprints – make your back-end developers happy!

Back-end Development

Well mate, if you got here, then you definitely made few people happy as you’re still alive, and started thinking about the standardisation of project, and caring about others health. Because these guys are all about standards and they truly know where you live – the most severe type of “psychopaths” in the list so far.

To cut the bashing part of the story, please setup a set of prerequisites for the teams. Get some standards to streamline the shipment of your app.

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